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resources:provenance:main [2020/04/30 09:20]
lefferts [CERL Provenance Digital Archive]
resources:provenance:main [2020/05/06 09:10]
lefferts [CERL Provenance Digital Archive]
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   * [[https://​www.cerl.org/​resources/​provenance/​geographical|External electronic resources recording provenance information]]   * [[https://​www.cerl.org/​resources/​provenance/​geographical|External electronic resources recording provenance information]]
   *  [[https://​www.cerl.org/​resources/​provenance/​main#​cerl_provenance_digital_archive|Can-you-help?​]]:​ Unidentified provenance marks   *  [[https://​www.cerl.org/​resources/​provenance/​main#​cerl_provenance_digital_archive|Can-you-help?​]]:​ Unidentified provenance marks
 +  * [[https://​www.cerl.org/​collaboration/​work/​provenance/​main|Read about the work of the Provenance Working Group]]
  
 Interest in provenance information goes in and out of fashion. Once it was a bibliophilic interest concerned with authors’ association copies and books belonging to great men. Following the rise of the history of the book in the 1980s and 1990s, provenance studies have become an important ingredient in the work of social and cultural historians dealing with questions of readership and literacy. The ownership of books by craftsmen and women is now as significant as that of kings and archbishops. At the same time, a separate development of concern about the security of library collections has widened interest in recording provenances of all sorts, ancient and modern. Interest in provenance information goes in and out of fashion. Once it was a bibliophilic interest concerned with authors’ association copies and books belonging to great men. Following the rise of the history of the book in the 1980s and 1990s, provenance studies have become an important ingredient in the work of social and cultural historians dealing with questions of readership and literacy. The ownership of books by craftsmen and women is now as significant as that of kings and archbishops. At the same time, a separate development of concern about the security of library collections has widened interest in recording provenances of all sorts, ancient and modern.
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 ==== CERL Provenance Digital Archive ==== ==== CERL Provenance Digital Archive ====
  
-A free service, the [[http://​arkyves.org/​r/​cerl/pda|CERL Provenance Digital Archive]] (hosted by Arkyves), has been created. You can login with your Google, Facebook or ORCID account.+A free service, the [[https://www.arkyves.org/​r/​section/​him_CERLPDA/|CERL Provenance Digital Archive]] (hosted by Arkyves), has been created. You can login with your Google, Facebook or ORCID account.
  
 The CERL PDA provides a user environment for recording provenance evidence for both identified and unidentified former owners. After you have logged in, you can post provenance evidences (including images) and post replies to other people'​s uploads (including requests for assistance in identifying former owners). You can find more information on how to contribute to the CERL PDA in these [[https://​www.cerl.org/​resources/​provenance/​pdaguidelines|Guidelines]]. The CERL PDA provides a user environment for recording provenance evidence for both identified and unidentified former owners. After you have logged in, you can post provenance evidences (including images) and post replies to other people'​s uploads (including requests for assistance in identifying former owners). You can find more information on how to contribute to the CERL PDA in these [[https://​www.cerl.org/​resources/​provenance/​pdaguidelines|Guidelines]].
 resources/provenance/main.txt · Last modified: 2020/05/06 09:10 by lefferts

 

 

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